The Snowball – a Christmas retro cocktail

It is Christmas 1965. Harold Wilson leads a Labour Government. Lyndon Johnson has committed massive US Forces in Vietnam. There is a coup in Dahomey. The Beatles are top of the UK Hit Parade with their Day Tripper/ We Can Work It Out double A side, but they are closely pursued by such luminaries as The Seekers and Ken Dodd. The cool cars of the year were the Rolls Royce Silver Cloud III and the James Bond Aston Martin DB5, both pictured above. (are they real?-ed) If you had wanted, you could have driven them home from pub or party, for Barbara Castle‘s Drink and Driving Act was still two years away from bringing down the alcohol-fuelled carnage on nineteen sixties roads.

And at that pub or party, the cool cocktail of the season was The Snowball. It’s a heady mix of lemonade and Advocaat. We have a recipe below, but it’s the latter we want to concentrate on. It’s almost forgotten now, but back in ’65 it used to fly off of the shelves. Advocaat is a Dutch drink, a curious mix of eggs, sugar and brandy with a strong yellow colour. It looks and tastes like custard and is delicious. We suspect its place as the sweet thick aperitif has been taken by the likes of Baileys. Nevertheless if your chocolate buds are jaded, here’s a nice little alternative-just don’t mix it up with the custard on your Christmas pudding. Or might you? And talking of eggs, Faberge had recently launched their new brand of aftershave, Brut, which must have delighted many under the mistletoe. Ask your Granny.

To wish you good Christmas cheer we have two links, a Wikipedia one to Advocaat and the other from the BBC Food website. Both organisations are beacons of light in a darkening world and we beg you earnestly to lens them your support. Here’s to Merry Christmas.

Snowball: 50 ml lemonade. 50 ml Dutch advocaat. 10 ml lime juice. Add ice and a cocktail cherry to decorate

Advocaat – Wikipedia

Snowball cocktail recipe – BBC Good Food

#warninks #bols #faberge #advocaat #snowballl #christmas

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